ADdiction

adteachings:

Usually, advertising that presents a practical benefit can deliver its message in one of two ways. You can focus on the problem that needs solving, or you can focus on the solution offered by the advertiser.

Creative people generally prefer dramatizing the problem, because problems provide the most obvious opportunities to do work that’s edgy, impactful and, we hope, award winning. When clients ask us to be sunshiny and positive in our work, we tend to roll our eyes (privately, of course).

But when it comes to PSAs about texting and driving, we’ve seen so many problem-oriented ads – good and bad – that the negative approach now feels exhausted. Broken bodies, broken type, smashed cars, they’ve all been done multiple times.

So is it possible to do great, solution-oriented ads on the subject? LG2 in Montreal proves that it is.

Source: Ads of the World

Advertising Agency: Lg2, Quebec, Canada
Creative Director / Art Director: Luc Du Sault
Copywriter: Nicolas Boisvert
Accounts: Sandie Lafleur, Alexandra Laverdiere, Catherine Darius
Director: Nicolas Monette
Production House: Quatre Zero Un
Agency Producer: Julie Lorazo
Sound Design: Boogie Studio

adteachings:

This idea implies that there’s a direct connection between public donations and getting the police to arrest violent men, which I’m sure is not the reality. But in any case, this is a really good idea in terms of demonstrating a concrete benefit of donating.

helloyoucreatives:

Dogs make you happier. 

helloyoucreatives:

Dogs make you happier. 

karenhurley:

Brand: Amouage, Surf Magazine Art Director: Elias Fahir, Africa, Morocco

karenhurley:

Brand: Amouage, Surf Magazine 
Art Director: Elias Fahir, Africa, Morocco

helloyoucreatives:

The latest from Guinness

helloyoucreatives:

The latest from Guinness

helloyoucreatives:

"When small deliveries become large"

helloyoucreatives:

"When small deliveries become large"

helloyoucreatives:

A world first interactive TV campaign where users control the story via Twitter. #MercedesUK #NewAClass http://www.youtube.com/youdrive

adteachings:

I’d like to start with a major hat tip to Yoann Michaux, whose lovely blog was the source for most of today’s ads.

This is the time of year when award-hungry creatives (it’s usually not the clients) scramble to do ads that somehow reference Christmas. Each of the ads above presents some sort of intersection (or, if you prefer, mashup) between an image of Christmas and whatever the advertising brand happens to offer. How do we decide who has succeeded and who has failed?

For me, one big factor is the degree of obviousness to the contrivance. Of course, everything here is contrived, but some contrivances are so artfully handled that they make us want to believe. (This is what the English poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge called “the willing suspension of disbelief.”)

I have no wish to believe in the Quality Street ad, because its premise is just corny and lazy: They want us to believe that the product has enough “magic” to “create” Christmas, even when randomly spilled. Yeah, no.

The executions with the French fries and beer foam are equally unbelievable, but since their promise is not nearly so bombastic as Quality Street’s, I got a bit of a smile.

The quality of the execution is also a factor. Clearly, a ton of work went into the  Disneyland Paris ad, but it took me more than a second to see the silhouette of Mickey Mouse in Santa’s nose and glasses. For ads like this to work, the “get” has to be much quicker. (The brain has a much harder time interpreting light silhouettes than dark ones.)

The best ads here do more than simply reference Christmas; they also connect to what the product actually does. When this standard is applied, only the Tide and Mercedes-Benz ads succeed. I wish the Tide “tree” had been a bit more randomly executed (its clarity accentuates the contrivance, unfortunately), but the ad is still very nice.

For me, the big winner is the Mercedes-Benz ad. While celebrating Christmas, it also manages to reference the superior safety of the brand’s headlight system. The shot also wonderfully captures that deer-in-the-headlights vibe. Finally, the idea is so tight that it needs no copy – not even a logo. Total win.

Merry Christmas, everyone.

Other source: I Believe in Advertising

CREDITS (Where available)

Mercedes-Benz:

Advertising Agency: BBDO, Toronto, Canada
Executive Creative Directors: Peter Ignazi, Carlos Moreno
Associate Creative Director: Linda Carte
Art Director: Spencer Dingle
Copywriter: Jordan Hamer
Photographer: Philip Rostron
Account Directors: Chris Edmeades, Julia Dewar
Account Executive: Alex Potter

Disneyland Paris:

Advertising Agency: BETC, Paris, France
Creative Directors: Richard Desrousseaux, Etienne Turquet
Account Managers: Carole Bilde, Romain Van Den Plas, Adeline Dupuits
Art Director: Landry Starck
Copywriter: Pascal André
Art Buyer: Stéphanie Giordano
Print Producer: Agnès Cattelan
Photographer: Jean-Yves Lemoigne
Retouching: Fred Perrot

helloyoucreatives:

Samsung’s slightly sweet spot for the Galaxy Note II. 

adteachings:

Very nice indeed.
adblogger-at:

Gardena. The World’s Quietest Lawn Mower.

adteachings:

Very nice indeed.

adblogger-at:

Gardena. The World’s Quietest Lawn Mower.